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Mathematics

The Middle School Math Program is designed to develop students’ appreciation of problem solving through the exploration and application of mathematical concepts. Through a collaborative learning environment, students are encouraged to drive their own learning while reinforcing the skills and number sense developed in earlier grades. Math offerings introduce students to more symbolic and graphical representations of mathematics while developing critical thinking skills. Throughout the curriculum, students will be introduced to topics in pre-algebra, algebra, geometry, probability and statistics.

Middle School Mathematics Courses

Math 1 (#13127)

This course is designed to engage students in learning mathematical concepts through collaboration and self-discovery. Topics to be covered include: integers, fractions, decimals, mixed numbers, percentages, and their related applications to real world problems. Equation solving, as a main thread, will be woven throughout the course to create connections to algebra. Ratios, rates, and proportions will be emphasized. Graphing, data analysis, and probability will be introduced. Geometry concepts will include angles, area, circumference, perimeter, volume, and surface area.

Math 2 (#13128)

This course will build off of the framework of Math 1 and add higher levels of mathematics in a collaborative learning environment focused on self-discovery and group sharing. Real world connections to functions and problem solving will be emphasized throughout the course. A large portion of the course will focus on early algebra including inequalities, equation solving, interpreting graphs, exponents, polynomials operations, factoring, systems of equations, and radicals. Geometry topics will cover volume and surface area of three-dimensional figures as well as early concepts with angles and similarity. Students will explore probability and expected value as well as work with bivariate data, sampling and inference between two populations.

Math 3x (#13131)

Math 3x is a continuation of the Middle School mathematics curriculum designed to prepare students for the Upper School mathematics program. By individual investigation and group collaboration, students will delve into such topics as functions, rational expressions, rational equations, and quadratics. The concepts of factoring, systems of equations, and radicals will be further explored. Real world applications are presented within the course content. Geometry concepts will include an introduction to congruence and further analysis of similarity. The course will expand upon the previous study of volume and surface area of three-dimensional figures. Probability will be further developed, including probability models, conditional probability and an introduction to counting principles.

Math 3y (#13132)

Math 3y is a continuation of the Middle School mathematics curriculum designed to prepare students for the Upper School mathematics program. By individual investigation and group collaboration, students will delve into such topics as quadratic, polynomial, rational, and exponential functions. Linear inequalities and systems of linear inequalities will be studied. Right triangle relationships as well as coordinate geometry will be introduced, including an exploration of the concepts of similarity and congruence. The course will expand upon the previous study of volume and surface area of three-dimensional figures. Probability will be further developed, including probability models, conditional probability and an introduction to counting principles.

Geometry (#13316)

Major year course. 3 credits. Forms II, III, & IV. Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra.

Geometry is an integrated course in plane and solid geometry which begins with a brief history of geometry and a discussion of logic and methods of proof. The usual theorems of Euclidean geometry are studied, and at appropriate times the natural extensions of solid geometry are made. Students are not required to memorize the proofs of theorems, but are expected to be able to construct good proofs of original problems. Much work is done with “numericals,” and considerable skill in algebra is necessary.